By age

Data source: Ontario HIV Laboratory Cohort
 

Key points

  • Individuals in the Ontario HIV Laboratory Cohort were considered to be in care if they received at least one viral load (VL) test in a given year.
  • The percent of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care increased over time for all age categories and was slightly higher for people of older ages.
  • Time from HIV diagnosis to linkage to care improved over time for all age categories and was slightly better for people of older ages.

 

Figures

Figure 1 Percent of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care by age category, 2000 to 2015


Trends: Between 2000 and 2015, the percent of people with diagnosed HIV who were in care increased slightly across all age categories and was generally slightly higher for people of older ages. In 2015, the percent in care was 85.3%, 81.8%, 85.3%, 88.8% and 90.0% for those aged 24 or younger, 25 to 34, 35 to 44, 45 to 54, and 55 or older, respectively. See Tables 1 and 2 below for data and definitions.


Figure 2 Percent of people newly diagnosed with HIV in Ontario who linked to care within three months of diagnosis by age category, 2000 to 2014


Trends: Between 2000 and 2014, the percent of newly diagnosed people who linked to care within three months of diagnosis increased across all age categories and was generally slightly higher for people of older ages. In 2012-2014, the percent linked to care within three months of diagnosis was 82.9%, 79.6%, 84.5%, 85.8% and 84.4% for those aged 24 or younger, 25 to 34, 35 to 44, 45 to 54, and 55 or older, respectively. See Tables 3 and 4 below for data and definitions.
 

Tables and definitions

Table 1 Number of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care by age category, 2000 to 2015


“In care” definition
At least one viral load test in a given year

Table 2 Percent of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care by age category, 2000 to 2015


Estimate of percent in care “In care” definition (numerator) “Diagnosed” definition (denominator)
Main At least one viral load test (See Table 1 above for data) Nominal HIV-positive diagnostic test or at least one HIV viral load test, and not administratively lost to follow-up after 2 years (See Table 2 here for data)

Table 3 Number of people newly diagnosed with HIV in Ontario who linked to care within three months of diagnosis by age category, 2000 to 2014


“Linked to care” definition
First viral load test within three months of HIV diagnosis

Table 4 Percent of people newly diagnosed with HIV in Ontario who linked to care within three months of diagnosis by age category, 2000 to 2014


Estimate of percent linked to care “Linked to care” definition (numerator) “Newly diagnosed” definition (denominator)
Main First viral load test within three months of HIV diagnosis (See Table 3 above for data) Nominal HIV-positive diagnostic test and no evidence of previous diagnosis (i.e. no detectable viral load test or CD4 count before diagnosis date, and first VL after diagnosis not virally suppressed) (Data not shown)

 
Notes: Data provided by Public Health Ontario Laboratories. Individuals missing information on age were excluded (approximately 0.2%). Percents aggregated over multiple years to reduce year-to-year variation due to small counts (Figure 2 and Tables 3 and 4). The year 2015 not included as some individuals diagnosed in this year would not have had time to link to care (Figure 2 and Tables 3 and 4). Tables and Figures display main estimates only. A range of plausible values, calculated using alternate definitions, are available upon request.