Summary

Data source: Ontario HIV Laboratory Cohort
 

Key points

  • Individuals in the Ontario HIV Laboratory Cohort were considered to be in care if they received at least one viral load (VL) test in a given year.
  • The number in care has increased steadily over time from 7,203 in 2000 to 14,065 in 2015 (i.e. 14,065 individuals had at least one VL test in 2015). This increase highlights a persistent and increasing demand for HIV-related services.
  • The percent of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care was 81% in 2000 (lower estimate: 63%) and 87% in 2015 (lower estimate: 81%). Further, the percent of newly diagnosed individuals who were linked to care within three months of HIV diagnosis increased from 67% in 2000 to 82% in 2014.
  • These improvements may be due to several factors, including better access to care, greater incentives for entering and staying in care (e.g. more effective treatments), and interventions that link individuals to care after diagnosis and retain them in care.
  • Changes to provider practices with regards to frequency of VL testing may have also influenced these trends. For example, some providers may conduct less frequent VL monitoring for people living with HIV who are healthy and consistently adhering to ART

 

Figures

Figure 1 Number of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care, 2000 to 2015


Snapshot: The number of people in care increased from 7,203 in 2000 to 14,065 in 2015. See Table 1 below for data and definitions.


Figure 2 Percent of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who were in care, 2000 to 2015


Snapshot:  The percent of people with diagnosed HIV who were in care was 81.3% in 2000 (lower estimate: 63.2%) and 87.3% in 2015 (lower estimate: 80.7%). See Table 1 below for data and definitions.


Figure 3 Time from HIV diagnosis to linkage to care for people newly diagnosed with HIV in Ontario, 2000 to 2014


Snapshot:  The percent of newly diagnosed people linked to care within three months of diagnosis increased from 67.4% in 2000 to 81.8% in 2014. See Table 2 below for data and definitions.

Notes: Solid line in Figure 2 represents main estimate and shaded area represents range of estimates.
 

Tables and definitions

Table 1 Number and percent of people with diagnosed HIV living in Ontario who are in care, 2000 to 2015
Estimate of percent in care “In care” definition (numerator) “Diagnosed” definition (denominator)
Main At least one VL test (Main estimate) Nominal HIV-positive diagnostic test or HIV viral load test, and not administratively lost to follow-up after 2 years (Main estimate)
Lower At least one VL test (Main estimate) Nominal or non-nominal HIV-positive diagnostic test or HIV viral load test, and not administratively lost to follow-up after 3 years (Upper estimate)

Table 2 Number and percent of people newly diagnosed with HIV in Ontario who are linked to care within a certain period of time after HIV diagnosis, 2000 to 2014
Estimate of percent linked to care “Linkage to care” definition (numerator) “Newly diagnosed” definition (denominator)
Main Number of months from HIV diagnosis to first VL test Nominal HIV-positive diagnostic test and no evidence of being previously diagnosed (i.e. no record of a detectable VL test or CD4 count before diagnosis, and first VL after diagnosis not suppressed)

 
Notes: Data provided by Public Health Ontario Laboratories.