By race/ethnicity 2017

Data source: Public Health Ontario Laboratory HIV Datamart

Key points

  • From 2012 to 2017, about half of new HIV diagnoses each year were among individuals with White race/ethnicity and a quarter were among people with Black race/ethnicity.
  • Half (49.8%) of males with a new HIV diagnosis in 2016/17 were of White race/ethnicity and over half (54.3%) of females with a new HIV diagnoses in 2016/17 were of Black race/ethnicity.
  • In 2016/17 compared to 2012/13, the proportion of new HIV diagnoses decreased among White males while increasing among Black males and increased among White females while decreasing among Black females.
  • Between 2012 to 2017, there was an increase in the proportion of new HIV diagnoses where the individuals were Black males, East/Southeast Asian males, Arab/West Asian males, Latin American males and White females. There was a decrease in the proportion of new HIV diagnoses where the individuals were White males, Indigenous males and Black females. Note: not all data was reported due to low two-year combined diagnoses counts.

 

Figures

Figure 1 Percent of new HIV diagnoses by race/ethnicity (where known), Ontario, 2012 to 2017

Snapshot: The percent of new HIV diagnoses has consistently been highest among White people followed by Black people. There was a decrease in the percent of new HIV diagnoses among White (11.1%) and South Asian (15.2%) people between 2012/2013 to 2016/2017. There was an increase in the percent of new HIV diagnoses among Black (1.6%), Indigenous (23.1%), East/Southeast Asian (34.4%), Arab/West Asian (121.4%) and Latin American (20.9%) people between 2012/2013 to 2016/2017. Any interpretation of race/ethnicity combined data (Figure 1) should be mindful that some trends stratified by sex (Figures 2 and 3) differ and could vary the interpretation of findings.


Figure 2 Percent of new HIV diagnoses by race/ethnicity (where known), males, Ontario, 2012 to 2017

Snapshot: The percent of new HIV diagnoses among males has consistently been highest among White males followed by Black males. There was a decrease in the percent of new HIV diagnoses among White (13.1%), Indigenous (14.8%) and South Asian males (8.3%) between 2012/2013 to 2016/2017. There was an increase in the percent of new HIV diagnoses among Black (15.0%), East/Southeast Asian (31.1%) and Latin American (25.6%) males between 2012/2013 to 2016/2017. Trends over time for Arab/West Asian male race/ethnicity are not reported due to low (<20) two-year combined diagnoses counts.


Figure 3 Percent of new HIV diagnoses by race/ethnicity (where known), females, Ontario, 2012 to 2017

Snapshot: The percent of new HIV diagnoses among females has consistently been highest among Black females followed by White females. There was a decrease in the percent of new HIV diagnoses among Black (18.1%) females between 2012/2013 to 2016/2017. There was an increase in the percent of new HIV diagnoses among White (17.3%) females between 2012/2013 to 2016/2017. Trends over time for all other race/ethnicities are not reported due to low (<20) two-year combined diagnoses counts.

Tables

Table 1 Percent of new HIV diagnoses by race/ethnicity and sex, Ontario, 2012 to 2017

 

Notes: Data provided by Public Health Ontario Laboratory. Diagnoses where race/ethnicity was unknown were excluded (approximately 34% of diagnoses).