By age

Data source: Public Health Ontario Laboratory HIV Datamart
 

Key points

  • Over the past decade and for both sexes, the rate of tests per 1,000 people was consistently highest in the 25 to 29 age category and increased for most age groups (all except those aged 24 or less). However, the testing rate increased for all age categories from 2013-2014 to 2015-2016.
  • In 2016, the positivity rate was highest in the 50 to 54 age category for males (0.59%) and 55 to 59 age category for females (0.19%). The higher positivity rate among older males may be due to a consistently higher risk of HIV diagnosis among those born in the 1960s (males who were in their 20s during the 1980s – the height of the HIV epidemic).[1]

 

Figures

Figure 1 Number of HIV tests (thousands) and test positivity rate by age and sex, Ontario, 2016


Snapshot: In 2016, the number of tests was highest in the 25 to 29 age category for both males (45,642) and females (48,478). Testing was higher in younger age categories (less than 40 years of age) for females compared to males. The positivity rate was highest in the 50 to 54 age category for males (0.59%) and 55 to 59 age category for females (0.19%). See Table 1 below for data.


Figure 2 HIV testing rate per 1,000 people by sex and age, Ontario, 2016


Snapshot: In 2016, the number of tests per 1,000 people was highest in the 25 to 29 age category for both males (93.9) and females (98.7). Rates were higher in younger age categories (less than 40 years of age) for females compared to males. See Table 1 below for data.


Figure 3 HIV testing rate per 1,000 people by age, males, Ontario, 2007 to 2016


Snapshot: Between 2007 and 2016, the number of tests per 1,000 males was consistently highest in the 25 to 29 age category and increased for most age groups (except for those aged 24 or less). Between 2013-2014 and 2015-2016, the rate increased for all age groups. See Table 2 below for data.


Figure 4 HIV testing rate per 1,000 people by age, females, Ontario, 2007 to 2016


Snapshot: Between 2007 and 2016, the number of tests per 1,000 females was consistently highest in the 25 to 29 age category and increased for most age groups (except those aged 24 or less). Between 2013-2014 and 2015-2016, the rate increased for all age groups. See Table 3 below for data.
 

Tables

Table 1 Number and rate of HIV tests per 1,000 people and positivity rate by sex and age, Ontario, 2016


Table 2 Rate of HIV tests per 1,000 males by age, Ontario, 2007 to 2016


Table 3 Rate of HIV tests per 1,000 females by age, Ontario, 2007 to 2016


Notes: Data provided by Public Health Ontario Laboratory. HIV-negative prenatal tests not included. Tests with unknown age were excluded (less than 1%). Population estimates (all ages) retrieved from Statistics Canada.

[1] Analysis of trends in new HIV diagnoses in Ontario suggest a consistently higher risk of HIV diagnosis among men born in the 1960s (compared to some other birth cohorts). This may be due to a higher risk of HIV infection in this population.